16 Favorite Sources For Recipes

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source: Dana McMahan

I look everywhere for recipes.

I search my collection of 100+ cookbooks. I  spend tons of time (too much time) surfing cooking sites. And I constantly beg friends for their tastiest secrets.

As a result, I consider myself an expert on finding good recipes.

Here are 15 of my favorite sources for recipes

Allrecipes – Obviously, this has to be my first choice. I’ve found recipes for the perfect butter/margarine free cookies, cole slaw my sister-in-law drools over, and several very nice rice mixes. Plus, I adore skimming the variations and changes the readers write in about.

Friends – I share a lot of meals with family and friends so I frequently get to taste a variety of dishes. When I taste a recipe I like, I always call the next day and ask for it.

Quickies Cookbooks – I own both Quickies and Quickies 2, both by Monda Rosenberg. I also plan on purchasing Quickies Pasta. I’ve been using these super simple cookbooks for years and I love them.

Packaging – I’ve gotten some of my best recipes from the sides of packages. That’s how I first learned to make egg rolls, no-boil lasagne, and chocolate chip cheesecake.

Google – I love to put a random search term in Google and see what I come up with. One month I did nothing but enter in the names of countries plus the phrase “vegetarian appetizers”. Fun!

Joy Of Cooking (1975 version) – I use this mostly for baking. I really enjoy the pancakes, cakes and fruit breads and have made them many times. I consider these my “go-to recipes” for baking.

Recipe Notebooks – I have been keeping recipe notebooks since my early teens. Their stuffed full of handwritten recipes, copies of library cookbook recipes, online favorites and magazine clippings. By now, I have over a dozen recipe notebooks.

Kosher By DesignI own several of Susie Fishbein’s cookbooks and I wind up using them a lot. I’ve made her smoothie recipe, vegetarian cholent, and her Hasselback Potatoes.

Restaurant Menus – This is one of my stranger sources of recipes. I frequently look at online menus for unusual sandwich concepts or new potato bar ideas. Sometimes I use them for new smoothie combinations or pizza or ice cream toppings.

Quick and Easy CookbookThis is by the American Heart Society and I have a complete review here, along with my opinion on many of the specific recipes.

The Complete Passover Cookbook – Yes, I know, this book is meant only for Passover. I don’t care. We use it all year long and love it.

Experiments – I experiment a lot. I’ll read the title of a recipe just for inspiration and then I’ll make my own version of it, using my own ingredients and instructions. Or, after I pick out an interesting sounding recipe, I’ll read 5-6 versions of it, to get the basic ingredients and technical aspects down, but then make my own totally unique version.

The Complete Tightwad Gazette – Tightwad Gazette doesn’t have a lot of recipes, but every recipe  is special. My favorites are the Universal Recipes for muffins, casseroles, pilafs, etc. I’ve used these many times and they really work.

Youtube – I’ve gotten a few good recipes from Youtube cooking demonstrations. One, which I posted several years ago, is for a vegetarian bacon made from frying shredded cheese. I use this recipe at least one a week for lunch.

The 5 in 10 Pasta Cookbook – It amazes me that this book doesn’t have better rating on Amazon. It’s fabulous. I’ve made at least half of the non-meat dishes in the book,  and I loved them all but one (I don’t like sage!).

Miscellaneous cookbooks – I have also found one or two excellent recipes in Betty Crocker, The Great American Vegetarian, Saved By Soup and other assorted cookbooks, to numerous to mention.

11742257435_767e74b97f_zsource: Scott Akerman

Here are two recipes sources I’d like to try

Cooking Magazines – I actually have quite a few cooking magazines, including the special issues and annuals. For some reason, though, I almost never use them. I’m not even sure why, since the food looks very appealing.

Cooking Shows – I love to watch cooking shows but I never make anything from them. Maybe the stuff Emeril makes is too complicated for me, but I should be able to duplicate a Barefoot Contessa dish.

Please tell me your favorite source for recipes. I’d love to hear from you.

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Double Duty Your Expenses = Double Your Savings

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source: MzScarlett / A.K.A. Michelle

Several weeks ago, a friend without a stove asked if she could make a pound of black-eyed peas in my kitchen.

Not knowing that they take 2-4 hours to cook if not soaked first, we started at 10pm. By 1:30 am we were exhausted but the peas were tender.

As my friend started to move the peas into storage containers, she looked at the small amount and said, “You know, for this much trouble, we should have made two or three bags.”

Her simple comment got me started thinking. How much money could we save if we were more efficient?

I quickly realized that by making our expenditures do double duty, we can double (or triple) the benefit we get from them.

Housewifesource: Garry Knight

Here are some things I already do:

I already wait to buy highly perishable foods till I have several uses planned for them.  I like light cream but I hate when I have to throw out leftovers. To avoid this I use light cream on baked potatoes, burritos and vegetables until the container is completed.

I already buy unusual spices only if I have several recipes lined up.  I wanted to purchase an Indian spice called garam masala but I was afraid it would only be used once. To make sure this didn’t happen, I didn’t buy it till I had several Indian recipes I wanted to try.

I already wait to go to the pet store till I have enough money to stock up on everything I need. The pet store is an hour away by bus, so it doesn’t pay to go just for one thing. I make sure I purchase least 2-3 months worth of food, kitty litter, and flea collars every time I go.

I already cut up worn out clothes for rags or to make small objects from. I have cut up old skirts to make scarves, old nightgowns for rags and old t-shirts for pillowcases.

I already wait to call a plumber till I have several problems for him to look out. We had a very small leak in our hallway sink, so we simply turned off its’ valve till we needed to have more serious plumbing done. We knew we would have to pay a minimum charge, no matter how short the plumber’s visit,  so waited with the minor repair till we had a major repair to be taken care of.

I already lend out every book that I buy. I feel that as many people as possible ought to benefit from the cost of the book. And, in return, friends are happy to lend me their books.

8142124235_f5ece74126_zsource: Garry Knight

Here are some things I need to start to do:

I need to start thinking far enough ahead to combine grocery shopping with other errands. I frequently go to the grocery store one day and the doctor the next. I want to start combining my errands more carefully.

I need to start making large quantities of food when I cook. Gas costs almost the same if you cook one casserole at a time or four. The extra food can be frozen till it’s needed.

I need to start to only sign up for memberships when I am certain I will use the facilities (library, gym, museum) frequently. I have signed up for three different library memberships since I have lived in Israel. I have never used any of the libraries more than once.

I need to start saving food containers. I give out a lot of gifts of food each year and many used jelly bean jars, oatmeal containers and pickle bottle would be perfect to recycle.

I need to start sharing office supplies with my husband. There is no reason that we need two pairs of scissors, two tape dispensers, two white board markers and two hole punchers. If we shared we would get double the benefit from out purchases.

I need to start looking at the coupon and sale ads from every magazine or newspaper I purchase. That way, I’ll get the enjoyment of a good read, plus a financial savings.

Can you think of any other situations where you can get two uses from one expenditure? Please let me know and I will be happy to add it to my list.

Healthy and Delicious Matzoh Brei

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Matzah Brei Variation.jpgsource: Rebecca Siegel

Healthy versions of dishes are rarely more delicious than the originals. In fact, it almost never happens.

This lower-fat recipe for Matzoh Brei is one of the very few exceptions.

Traditional matzoh brei, made from matzoh and multiple eggs, is a heavy dish. Take out the extra eggs and you are left with a lower-fat, crisper, more flavorful variation. I think it tastes even better than its’ higher calorie counterpart.

This recipe, with a couple small changes, came from The Complete Passover Cookbook, by Frances R. AvRutick.

Ingredients

4 matzohs, broken into small pieces

3 cups water

1/2 cup chicken broth, made from power or bouillon

1 egg, beaten

3 tablespoons butter or olive oil

salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

Soak the broken matzoh in the water till soft, but not mushy. Drain well.

Stir in the egg and chicken broth.

Melt the butter or olive oil in a large, heavy pan, over medium heat.

Pour in the matzoh and egg mixture.

Using a spatula, turn mixture over (from bottom to top) when needed. Cook till excess liquid has disappeared and pieces are golden and slightly crispy. This should take from 3-5 minutes.

If done correctly, the completed Matzoh Brei should appear lightly browned, and end up in large, scrambled pieces.

Taste and add salt and pepper, if needed.

Serve immediately or refrigerate and reheat with 24 hours.

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10 Mondrian Themed Crafts For Adults

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tableau-number-4

source: Piet-Mondrian.org

Piet Mondrian was a Dutch born painter (1872-1944) who is know for his minimal style. According to Wikipedia he created a non-representational style which he call neoplasticism. To read more about this famous artist click here.

I enjoy the bold colors and strong geometric shapes of Piet Mondrian’s work.

Because his work is so distinctive, yet simple, it’s easy to duplicate in a wide variety of medium. Try it in paper, fabric, paint and even knitting. Any medium which allows for straight lines and multiple color changes will work.

Here are ten of my favorite Mondrian themed projects. Please keep in mind that the directions for some of these projects will need to be run through Google Translate.

Image 2The Making Of Mondrian Cake

818d2718907235.562d1b199012cMondrian Font

Mondrian-cube-500sqMondrian Modular Origami Cube

yslfinalMondrian Nail Design

Mondrian SoapMondrian Soap

Mondrian Wall ArtMondrian Mural

Mondrian-3Mondrian Wall Art

Mondrian Inspired JewelryMondrian Jewelry From Polymer Clay

000-mondrianrugpattern-dreamalittlebiggerFree Mondrian Hooked Rug Chart

tumblr_mtutf4PukP1su5vyvo1_500Mondrian Lego

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How To Exercise When Exercise Hurts

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how-to-exercise-when-exercise-hurtssource: Gioconda Beekman

My doctor is always telling me to walk more. He says I should be doing 10,000 steps, spread out through the day.

Easier said than done.

What he fails to understand, is that even short walks hurt. After just a few minutes my back burns, my hips flare up and my feet start to ache. Even the slightest exercise is quite difficult for me.

This used to make me very depressed. I felt like I could never get healthy.

However, I have come up with an effective solution that really fits my needs. It isn’t a long term exercise plan, but it works great as a way to ease into exercise.

What makes my method so useful?

  • I can do it indoors. There is no need to leave the house in bad weather.
  • I can walk when it’s convenient for me.
  • I can start off very slowly and gradually increase the length of time I work out.

If this sounds good, read on, because this may be the perfect exercise plan for you too.

Here’s What I Do:

1) I don’t schedule a specific time to exercise. Instead, every time I get up for any reason, that action “triggers” a walking session. In that way, I wind up with many irregularly timed walks, spread out throughout the day.

For instance, when I get up to get a drink of water, I immediately walk in place before resuming my seat.

Since I get up often (bathroom break, snack break, door bell, phone call, etc) I automatically get at least 10-15 mini walks daily without any planning involved.

If on occasion, I find I’m not getting up enough naturally, I do things to purposely increase my walking sessions. I may only eat half a snack at a time so hunger forces me up again in another hour. Or, I might make sure that tools I’ll need later in the day are in another room, instead of sitting on my desk.

2) To make it easy to get motivated, I only require myself to do 10 steps. That is such a quick and easy amount of exercise, that I am rarely reluctant to go through with it. However, I find that once I get started I’m usually willing to do a lot more.

I generally do between 100 and 300 steps. This is about 1-3 minutes worth of walking, which is the perfect amount to stretch out my back and hip muscles and refresh me.

However, as long as I do even the minimum 10 steps, I thank myself and congratulate myself for doing a good job.

3) My usual choice of activity is to walk in place. I don’t try to power walk or to race. I just do a simple, leisurely walk.

However, to avoid boredom, I sometimes vary my routine.

  • Every four steps do a small kick
  • Every four steps do a short grapevine routine
  • Incorporate some salsa steps
  • Every ten steps add four quick claps
  • Every ten steps add a right side step and then a left side step

4) When the walk is over, I then go back to my original activity and wait for the next naturally occurring break to arise. I continue to do this until I have done at least ten walking sessions throughout the course of the day.

Using this method I can do as many as 3,000 steps in a day.

This isn’t as much as my doctor is requesting, but through practice, I hope to get to the point that I can do a full walk around the neighborhood.

Already, I can walk from my apartment to the bus stop without much difficulty. This is a massive improvement for me.

Disclaimer: It’s important to check with your doctor before starting this, or any other, exercise routine.

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