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Category name:Recipes

Sweet And Sour Broccoli With Six Variations

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source: kaythaney

I’ve used this same sauce many times with chicken and vegetarian hot dogs. It suddenly dawned on me that it might be great on broccoli also. I made it on Friday and my son adored it, then had seconds, followed by thirds.

Ingredients

10 ounces frozen broccoli, defrosted

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar

1/3 cup ketchup

Directions

Cook broccoli in small amount of water and drain. When cool, squeeze broccoli lightly to get rid of excess water.

Place broccoli back into cooking pot, add additional ingredients, and reduce sauce till it is almost a glaze.

Variations

  1. Use green beans instead of broccoli
  2. Skip the broccoli and add chicken instead
  3. Top broccoli with chopped almonds
  4. Serve broccoli over rice
  5. Substitute vegetarian hot dogs for broccoli
  6. Replace the broccoli with meatballs

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Passover Spinach Lasagne

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source: Edsel Little

Delicious change of pace from our normal lasagne. I don’t know why I don’t make this more often!

Ingredients

6 slices matzoh

1 1/2 cup shredded cheese

1/2 onion, finely chopped

16 oz cottage cheese

16 oz spinach, defrosted

salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, to taste

non-stick spray

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray a 13x9x2 pan with the non-stick spray.

Soak matzohs in water for 2-3 minutes.

Lightly squeeze excess water from spinach (it should still be somewhat moist). Combine with cottage cheese, 1 cup shredded cheese and chopped onion. Add seasonings to taste.

Place a layer of 2 matzohs, side by side, in the pan. Cover with 1/3 of the spinach mixture. Repeat 2x.

Sprinkle 1/2 cup of shredded cheese on top of the last spinach layer.

Cover well with aluminum foil and bake for one hour.

Note: Lasagne comes out of the oven very most, but excess water will absorb within a few hours. However, there is no need to wait. Even moist, lasagne is delicious.

Variation: For a fancier dish,  substitute round matzohs for square ones.

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Passover Vegetable Latkes With Three Variations

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source: Meng He

I came up with this hearty recipe over the weekend. First, I started with a classic matzoh meal latke. Then, I added some veggies, adjusted the seasonings, and the result was this Passover friendly vegetable latke.

Ingredients

1 cup matzoh meal

1 medium onion, grated

1 medium carrot, grated

3 eggs

1 cup water

1 tsp. salt

1 pinch pepper

olive oil

Directions

In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients except olive oil.

Pour a small amount of olive oil onto a high quality, non-stick frying pan.

When the oil is hot, spoon some of the matzoh meal/vegetable mixture onto the pan. When the bottom of the latke looks solid, flip it. When the latke is finished cooking, taste to determine if more salt, pepper or water is needed. Add additional ingredients if necessary.

Cook the rest of the raw mixture in several batches, just like making standard pancakes. These can be eaten plain, with gravy, or with ketchup.

Variations

  1. Add 1/2 cup grated zucchini
  2. Serve with a spicy tomato sauce
  3. Substitute chicken broth for the water

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Stir-Fry Broccoli With Garlic, Onion And Almonds

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source: cyclonebill

I use frozen broccoli to make this tasty side dish. Fresh broccoli may taste better, but frozen broccoli has already been cleaned, checked for bugs, and cut into florets.

Ingredients

10 ounce bag frozen broccoli florets, defrosted

2-6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped

1/4 cup almonds, halved

2 tablespoons condensed chicken soup

1 small onion, peeled and chopped

olive oil

salt, to taste

pepper, to taste

Directions

Stir fry the broccoli and onion in the oil till almost tender.

Add the garlic, almonds, and chicken soup and cook till the chicken soup has evaporated and the garlic is soft. Add more chicken soup if needed.

Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

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Middle Eastern Mezze Platter

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  source: Lauren Friedman

I’m having a close friend over to eat at my home this Sabbath. We are both vegetarians, and neither of us wanted to cook, so we decided to create an (almost) authentic Middle Eastern Mezze platter. Since we live in Israel, and the stores here have tons of ready made (and cheap) mezze available, this was a quick and easy option for us.

What are mezze? Mezze are a collection of small salads, dips and relishes commonly served in Middle Eastern countries as a type of appetizer. There are usually at least 5 or 6 dishes, and they are usually cold. Mezze generally show up at quality restaurants, weddings, and at-home formal dinners.

Since we are eating the mezze for the entire meal, we decided to go a little nuts, and we served 21 dishes.

Here’s what we served:

Breads

pita bread

rolls

whole, uncut rye bread

crackers

Dips

olive dip

olive oil with crushed garlic

techina

hummos with spicy crushed peppers

olive oil with zatar

Relishes

olives

pickles

Salads

potato salad

cole slaw

mushroom salad

corn salad

carrot salad (2 kinds)

veggie salad

Turkish salad

beet salad

eggplant salad

Dessert was a selection of Turkish sweets very similar to baklava. They have a layered crust and are stuffed with sugar syrup and pistachios, almonds or walnuts.

source: Hisham Assaad

I already had all of the dips, breads and relishes in the house as staples. My friend and I split the tiny containers of salads and she also bought the dessert. The salads cost about $2.00 US dollars each and I have no idea what my friend payed for the pastries. If you use plenty of bread, like we do, this meal will feed 12 people, with leftovers.

By the way, there are a lot of variations in mezze platters. My father-in-law serves broccoli salad, cole slaw, potato salad, lox and herring. My sister-in-law serves hard boiled eggs with fried onion, pickles, potato salad, hummos, techina and a dill/mayonnaise dip. My favorite restaurant serves garlic olive oil, hummos, techina, sun-dried tomato dip and bean dip. I usually serve broccoli salad, cole slaw, hummos and crackers, baked garlic with challah, and a vegetable salad.

source: capitu (ou marcela)

If your interested in making your own mezze platters, here are some guidelines.

  1. Any kind of easy salad, dip or relish will do. Choose your own favorites.
  2. Keep the dishes simple. Most of the salads feature only one vegetable with some kind of sauce or dressing.
  3. Go for variety, not quantity. Unless you are having a large crowd, go for the smallest containers you can find.
  4. Take a look at your local Jewish deli. Jewish delis often have mezze available (though they aren’t often called by that name).

For instructions on making homemade mezze, please see my article called Mezze Recipes.

If you decide to make your own Mezze email me with your menu. I’d love to hear what you served.

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Michal’s Deli Wraps

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2731224987_a109dea7b5_osource: Annette Young

There are probably as many ways to make deli wraps as there are people who eat them. However, I got the basic idea for this versatile deli wrap sandwich from my friend Michal. I like it because it looks fancy, but can be made in minutes.

Ingredients

flour tortillas

2 slices deli per wrap

mustard

ketchup

Directions

Mix together a ratio of 2 parts mustard to 1 part ketchup.

Place wrap on a plate. Spread mustard/ketchup mixture over wrap, using slightly less than you would use on a typical sandwich.

Layer on the 2 slices of deli (I use turkey roll), overlapping where needed.

Roll sandwich up. Cut into thirds or fourths. If needed use toothpicks to keep rolls from coming apart.

Variations: Instead of the mustard/ketchup sauce,  try garlic dressing, honey mustard dressing, or even a mix of mayonnaise and mustard. Or, add lettuce, vegan cheese, thinly sliced pickles (as pictured in the photo above).

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16 Favorite Sources For Recipes

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source: Dana McMahan

I look everywhere for recipes.

I search my collection of 100+ cookbooks. I  spend tons of time (too much time) surfing cooking sites. And I constantly beg friends for their tastiest secrets.

As a result, I consider myself an expert on finding good recipes.

Here are 15 of my favorite sources for recipes

Allrecipes – Obviously, this has to be my first choice. I’ve found recipes for the perfect butter/margarine free cookies, cole slaw my sister-in-law drools over, and several very nice rice mixes. Plus, I adore skimming the variations and changes the readers write in about.

Friends – I share a lot of meals with family and friends so I frequently get to taste a variety of dishes. When I taste a recipe I like, I always call the next day and ask for it.

Quickies Cookbooks – I own both Quickies and Quickies 2, both by Monda Rosenberg. I also plan on purchasing Quickies Pasta. I’ve been using these super simple cookbooks for years and I love them.

Packaging – I’ve gotten some of my best recipes from the sides of packages. That’s how I first learned to make egg rolls, no-boil lasagne, and chocolate chip cheesecake.

Google – I love to put a random search term in Google and see what I come up with. One month I did nothing but enter in the names of countries plus the phrase “vegetarian appetizers”. Fun!

Joy Of Cooking (1975 version) – I use this mostly for baking. I really enjoy the pancakes, cakes and fruit breads and have made them many times. I consider these my “go-to recipes” for baking.

Recipe Notebooks – I have been keeping recipe notebooks since my early teens. Their stuffed full of handwritten recipes, copies of library cookbook recipes, online favorites and magazine clippings. By now, I have over a dozen recipe notebooks.

Kosher By DesignI own several of Susie Fishbein’s cookbooks and I wind up using them a lot. I’ve made her smoothie recipe, vegetarian cholent, and her Hasselback Potatoes.

Restaurant Menus – This is one of my stranger sources of recipes. I frequently look at online menus for unusual sandwich concepts or new potato bar ideas. Sometimes I use them for new smoothie combinations or pizza or ice cream toppings.

Quick and Easy CookbookThis is by the American Heart Society and I have a complete review here, along with my opinion on many of the specific recipes.

The Complete Passover Cookbook – Yes, I know, this book is meant only for Passover. I don’t care. We use it all year long and love it.

Experiments – I experiment a lot. I’ll read the title of a recipe just for inspiration and then I’ll make my own version of it, using my own ingredients and instructions. Or, after I pick out an interesting sounding recipe, I’ll read 5-6 versions of it, to get the basic ingredients and technical aspects down, but then make my own totally unique version.

The Complete Tightwad Gazette – Tightwad Gazette doesn’t have a lot of recipes, but every recipe  is special. My favorites are the Universal Recipes for muffins, casseroles, pilafs, etc. I’ve used these many times and they really work.

Youtube – I’ve gotten a few good recipes from Youtube cooking demonstrations. One, which I posted several years ago, is for a vegetarian bacon made from frying shredded cheese. I use this recipe at least one a week for lunch.

The 5 in 10 Pasta Cookbook – It amazes me that this book doesn’t have better rating on Amazon. It’s fabulous. I’ve made at least half of the non-meat dishes in the book,  and I loved them all but one (I don’t like sage!).

Miscellaneous cookbooks – I have also found one or two excellent recipes in Betty Crocker, The Great American Vegetarian, Saved By Soup and other assorted cookbooks, to numerous to mention.

11742257435_767e74b97f_zsource: Scott Akerman

Here are two recipes sources I’d like to try

Cooking Magazines – I actually have quite a few cooking magazines, including the special issues and annuals. For some reason, though, I almost never use them. I’m not even sure why, since the food looks very appealing.

Cooking Shows – I love to watch cooking shows but I never make anything from them. Maybe the stuff Emeril makes is too complicated for me, but I should be able to duplicate a Barefoot Contessa dish.

Please tell me your favorite source for recipes. I’d love to hear from you.

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