Sewing | Craft x Stew
Category name:Sewing

Homemade Dickie

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Homemade Dickie

source: Miles Kimball

I have quite a few shirts that I dislike because of their necklines. They aren’t immodest by most people’s standards, but they are still lower than what I enjoy wearing.I was going through my closet yesterday and I decided to throw those shirts, plus a mock turtleneck with a stained front, into the garbage. Just as I was reaching for the trash, genius struck.

Why couldn’t I combine the shirts with the low necklines with the turtleneck?

I tried on several of the low cut shirts on top of the turtleneck and they looked great. The only problem was that I was waaay to hot for comfort.

I went to throw the shirts into the garbage a second time, and genius struck again.

I decided to make a homemade dickie out of the mock turtleneck. I took a scissors and cut the sleeves off the turtleneck and cut the sides open. Then I cut off its front and back till about 3 inches below the neckline. I tried it on with the other shirts again and this time it was perfect.

The result: Instead of throwing away four unusable shirts, I gained three very nice ones.

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70 Free Lingerie Sewing Patterns

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70 Free Lingerie Sewing Patterns

Free lingerie sewing patterns are hard to find on the internet. While free skirt patterns and tote patterns abound, free lingerie sewing patterns require sifting through hundreds of sites to locate.  Here are 75 patterns that I was able to find.

Bras

Caftans

Camisoles

Chemises

Complete Sets

Nightgowns

Socks

Pajamas

Panties

Robes

Slippers

Slips

Men’s Boxers

* Not originally designed as lingerie, but with a change of fabric, adapts very well.

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Sewing Tips

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sewing-tips

source: Tania & Artur

Scavenge torn or stained clothes for buttons, zippers, decorative trims and shoulder pads. Reuse them on new items.

Buy Fabric On Sale

Only buy fabric on sale. If you don’t mind waiting a few months, virtually everything in fabric stores is eventually reduced.

Reuse Large Skirts

The fabric from out-of-style skirts can be restyled into blouses for adults or play clothes for kids.

Search Alternative Sources

Look for fabric on ebay, flea markets, yard sales and thrift shops. I’ve found some great bargains at “alternative” sources.

Consider Sheets, etc.

Sheet, tablecloths, and some types of curtains can be restyled as clothing.

Let Friends Know What You Need

Let your friends, neighbors, co-workers and relatives know that you sew. You will be surprised by how many people have leftover fabric from a project that was planned, but never was started.

Use The Internet

There are plenty of free patterns on the internet. Peruse the freebies before you decide to pay for a pattern.

Buy Sale Patterns

Patterns should only be purchased on sale. Approximately once a season they go on sale for 80% off.

Preserve Patterns

Patterns are expensive. Preserve your patterns so that they can be used again and again.

Draft Patterns

If you are artistically inclined, consider learning to copy patterns or draft your own patterns. Amazon has several books on the subjects.

Buy Good Thread

Don’t try to save money buy skimping on thread. It’s one money saver that just isn’t worthwhile.

Borrow a Sewing Machine

Don’t go out and purchase a sewing machine right away. First try a few projects to make sure you will stick with your new interest.

Skip the Attachments

Most home sewers don’t need more than straight stitch, zig zag, button hole and zipper attachments. Skip the other attachments till you’re sure you will need them.

Use Coupons

Try to avoid making any retail purchases without a coupon in hand. Michael’s and Joann Fabrics make coupons readily available.

Be Organized

Make sure you know where to find your scissors, pins, weights, etc.  You never want to have to repurchase an item you already own.

Save Scraps

You never know when you’ll need a small piece of black fabric for contrasting collar or pockets.

Swap With A Friend

Fabric you might find to bright or tasteless may be perfect your neighbor’s diaper bag project.

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Quilting Tips

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 quilting-tipssource: Rosa Pomar

Recycle Fabric

Recycle unwanted clothes to make your quilts. If you can’t find the right color in your own stash, see what’s available at the thrift shop or what your friends no longer need.

Be Thrifty When Buying New

If you decide to purchase new quilting fabric, take a look at the ideas in the Sewing Tips section for frugal shopping ideas.

Search the Internet for Patterns

There’s no need to buy quilting patterns or books. The internet is overflowing with beautiful patterns. Take a look at the World Wide Quilting Page for tons of great projects.

Utilize the Public Library

Consider borrowing books and magazines from the library. If you don’t see the specific book you want, ask the library to order it from interlibrary loan.

Recycle Batting

An old quilt, in good condition, may be used as the “filling” for your new one.

Don’t Buy Till You Try

Before you purchase a lot of expensive tools such as a cutting board and rotary cutter, make sure quilting is really the hobby for you. You don’t want to get bored with quilting two weeks after you went on a shopping spree.

Be Creative

A lot of quilting supplies can be made from things you have around the house. For instance, templates can be created from heavy pieces or cardboard.

Read The Tightwad Gazette

If you have access to the Tightwad Gazette books, I strongly recommend reading the sections on quilt making. You will find a lot of ideas on finding cheap supplies.

Shop Your Stash

Shop your stash before heading to the store. You may find some hidden treasures.

Skip the Sewing Machine

If you don’t own a sewing machine, consider hand sewing.  Many people, myself including, much prefer a hand sewn quilt to a machine sewn one.

Have Fabric Swap

Have an occasional fabric swap with friends. Fabrics that no longer fit your taste, may be perfect for your pals.

Create Small Projects

Consider creating small projects other than large and expensive quilts. Potholders, vests, pillows and lap quilts are all fun and a lot cheaper to make than a queen size quilt.

Learn Frugal Techniques

Learn scrap quilting and crazy quilting. Both of these techniques allow you to use up very small pieces of fabric.

Look for Freebies

Look for freebies. Never turn down a bag of old linens and discarded clothes. Search craig’s list. Regularly search your local freecycle.

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Make Your Own Sewing Supplies

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How To Make Your Own Sewing Supplies

Sewing can cost a small fortune if allowed to. After spending hundred of dollars on a machine, there are still fabrics, expensive patterns, notions and trims cramming the shelves of the stores. Buttons alone, can cost up to $10.00.

But there is a cheaper way. You can make your own sewing supplies.

Many sewing supplies can be made at home. Sewing machine covers, pincushions and bias tape can all be made from fabric scraps. Organizers, buttons and sewing kits can be crafted from materials sitting around the house. Even dress forms can be created in just a few hours.

Take a look at some of the links listed below and start saving money today!

Bias Tape And Piping

Buttons

Dress Forms

Embroidery Patterns

Fabric

Fabric Flowers

Free Patterns

Labels

Millinery Supplies

Needle Cases

Pincushions

Pins

Pressing Aids

Printables

Ribbons

Sewing Kits

Sewing Machine Accessories

Sewing Supply Organizers

Shoulder Pads

Trims

Weights

Everything Else

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34 Free Pants Patterns

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free pants patterns

Free Pants Patterns are rare on the internet.  Pants are a lot more difficult to make than say, a scarf or a skirt, so original patterns are a lot harder to create. However, after much sleuthing, we have tracked down what we consider to be a quite a good selection.

These free pants patterns run the gamut of sizes, sexes and styles. We’ve included everything from unisex yoga pants to super-stylish trouser pants.

Hope you enjoy!

Free Pants Patterns For Women

Free Pants Patterns For Men

Free Pants Patterns For Children

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Recycled Fitted Sheet

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underside-of-mattress2My favorite fitted sheet is about seven years old. It’s the only one I have ever found that has a wonderful two way stretch, so it has been impossible to replace. Unfortunately, over the last couple of months, it has started to develop holes down the center.

I’ve tried darning the holes a couple of times, but because the fabric is a knit, the repairs haven’t worked out well.

Here’s what I did instead:

First,  I located the flat sheet that came with the set. The flat sheet is still in good condition and about two feet larger than the fitted sheet in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

Next, I rounded each of the corners of the flat sheet and sewed a one inch hem all the way around except for a two inch gap.

Finally, I used a safety pin threaded through the top of a long piece of elastic, to push the elastic through the entire hem. The elastic entered and exited the hem through the two inch unsewn gap.

When I was through, I lay the new sheet over my mattress, pulled the hem to the underside of the mattress,  turned the mattress over and tied the ends of the elastic.

This sheet is a lot harder to put on than a regular fitted sheet. But like I said, the original was irreplaceable, so I’m very happy with the result.

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