Tutorials | Craft x Stew
Category name:Tutorials

Free Chevron Cross Stitch Pillow Pattern

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Chevron Cross Stitch

Here’s a free Chevron Cross Stitch Pillow pattern for you to try out. You may need to enlarge or shrink it to fit the dimensions of your pillow.

Since the pattern is hard too see, a close- up is pictured below.

Chevron Cross Stitch 2

This pattern also has other applications. It can be used as a pattern for a curtain sash, the trim of a girl’s dress, the border on a tablecloth, etc.

In addition, this pattern can also be used without any modifications, for needlepoint, latch hooking and a mosaic edge as well.

Read More: Needlepoint or Home

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Homemade Dickie

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Homemade Dickie

source: Miles Kimball

I have quite a few shirts that I dislike because of their necklines. They aren’t immodest by most people’s standards, but they are still lower than what I enjoy wearing.I was going through my closet yesterday and I decided to throw those shirts, plus a mock turtleneck with a stained front, into the garbage. Just as I was reaching for the trash, genius struck.

Why couldn’t I combine the shirts with the low necklines with the turtleneck?

I tried on several of the low cut shirts on top of the turtleneck and they looked great. The only problem was that I was waaay to hot for comfort.

I went to throw the shirts into the garbage a second time, and genius struck again.

I decided to make a homemade dickie out of the mock turtleneck. I took a scissors and cut the sleeves off the turtleneck and cut the sides open. Then I cut off its front and back till about 3 inches below the neckline. I tried it on with the other shirts again and this time it was perfect.

The result: Instead of throwing away four unusable shirts, I gained three very nice ones.

Read More: Sewing or Home

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25 Printable Vegan Recipe Cards

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25 Printable Vegan Recipe Cards

These recipe cards were made from some of my favorites recipes on the Craft Stew site. These are the recipes I make again and again. They are loved by both my family and the many guests we have frequently have. Hopefully, you’ll love them too.

To make these recipe cards, first download the 5 pdfs. Next, print out the pdfs on cardstock. Finally, carefully cut the cards out, trimming just inside the lines.

Download Set 1: Bubby’s Lemon Pie, Annette’s Almost Fat-Free Popcorn, Amazing 2-Ingredient Carrot Soup, 3-Ingredient Salsa Guacamole, “Oh So Healthy” Roasted Potatoes

Download Set 2: Egg Rolls Stuffed With Vegan Hot Dogs, Easy Vegetarian Chili, Easy Stir-Fried Vegetables, Easy Orzo With Three Variations, Dairy-Free Taco Salad,

Download Set 3: Have Stale Bread? Make Bruschetta!, Hasselback Potatoes, Glazed Hot Dogs Vegan-Style, Frozen Banana Dessert, Fancy Corn Salad 3 Ways

Download Set 4: Includes Spicy Indian Style Tomato Sauce, Quick and Healthy Tomato Salad, Just Wonderful Split Pea Soup, Jerusalem Pesto and Pasta Salad, Israeli Salad With Red Wine Vinegar

Download Set 5: Includes Vegan Hater’s Bean Soup, Vegetarian Sizzling Rice, Vegan Mashed Potatoes, Vegan I Can’t Believe It’s Not Chicken Soup, Vegan Almost Joes.

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How To Grow Hydroponic Herbs

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How To Grow Hydroponic HerbsI’m not much of a gardener. I’m too afraid of snakes and spiders to enjoy playing in the mud. And, the one year I really tried to grow something, my entire yield was three green peppers and a rotten watermelon.

The one exception to my purple thumb is hydroponic herbs. Growing hydroponic herbs is so easy, even I can do it. It’s a no-brainer.

How To Set Up A Hydroponic Garden

There are dozens of ways to set up a hydroponic garden, but I’m going to teach you to do it like I did. Besides being the fastest and easiest way, it’s also the cheapest.

1) Run out to the store and purchase herb seedlings, a package of large disposable plastic cups, a package of medium disposable plastic cups, vermiculite, some plant fertilizer and an 1/8 of a yard of polyester fabric.

2) Punch a hole in the bottom of one of the large plastic cups.

3) Cut out one 1″ x 6″ piece of polyester.

4) Thread the piece of polyester through the hole in the large plastic cup. Half of the length of fabric should sit on each side of the hole.

5) Holding the top end of the polyester straight up with one hand, fill the large plastic cup with vermiculite. The vermiculite should just about cover the polyester.

6) Fill a medium plastic cup 1/4 of the way up with water and a little bit of plant fertilizer.

7) Place the large plastic cup into the medium cup. There should always be a gap of air between the bottom of the larger cup and the water in the medium cup. The bottom half of the piece of polyester should hang from the larger cup, through the air, and into the medium cup.

How Does the Hydroponic Garden Work?

The piece of polyester works as a straw to suck water and fertilizer from the bottom cup into the top cup.

How To Use A Hydroponic Garden

To use the hydroponic garden, dampen the vermiculite with water. Then carefully rinse and shake the dirt from a herb seedling. Once the dirt is completely removed, place the seedling into the larger cup, gently fitting the roots into the vermiculite.

When the water in the bottom cup gets too low, pour more water/fertilizer through the vermiculite and into the bottom cup. Keep your plant on a sunny windowsill in a south facing exposure. Harvest herb immediately before use.

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The Old Fashioned Recipe Notebook

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recipe-notebookBefore I left the US, and decided to pare down my belongings, I owned 300+ cookbooks.  Even now, when I’ve spent the last six years simplifying my life, I still have over 100 cookbooks.  And yet, I rarely cook from a book.

Like a lot of women, at least 90% of the meals I make come from my own recipes,  accumulated over the years. My great aunt had slips of paper stuck in a cookbook and my mother had index cards organized in a file box, but it was all the same idea.  We  begged recipes from any great cook we came across, and kept them forever.

How I Store Recipes

I first stored my 25 year old accumulation of recipes by taping and stapling them into a spiral notebook.  When the pages started to fall apart, I glued them to computer paper, hole punched them, and filed them in a binder. In ten years, when the binder cracks, I’ll just buy a new one. The one thing I’ll never do, is throw the recipes out.

What’s In My Notebook?

The recipes in my notebook come from dozens of sources.  Some are from family members and neighbors whose food was so good I wanted to duplicate it.  Some of the recipes come from AllRecipes.com, my favorite online cooking source.  And, a lot, come from cookbooks.

The Cookbooks I Culled Recipes From

I must have penciled in recipes from at least 50 different cookbooks, but here are the ones that stick out in my mind.

  1. a biscuit and a pancake recipe from an old Joy of Cooking
  2. a universal muffin and a grain recipe from Tightwad Gazette
  3. a herb biscuit recipe from Herbal Treasures
  4. tons of pasta recipes from The 5 in 10 Pasta Cookbook
  5. a pizza dough recipe from The Fanny Farmer Baking Book
  6. a broccoli sauce recipe from an early Mollie Katzen books
  7. a chili recipe from Quickies (Chatelaine)

If you’ve spent years working on your own cookbook, or if you’ve inherited one from a relative, I’d love to hear about it.  Please drop me a line the comment box, and I’ll be happy to post it.

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Dr. Bob Scrapbook Page

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Dr. Bob Scrapbook Page

My husband is a big fan of the Twelve Steps. He lost around 175 pounds and has kept the weight off for about 10 years. He feels that he would never have been able to do it without the “program”.

So, off course when we were driving through Ohio, we HAD to stop off at Dr. Bob’s house. Dr. Bob’s kitchen is where much of the history AA took place. We toured the house, watched a video and bought a couple of things from the gift shop. Right before we left we took this picture of my now slim husband.

I’d love to give you a tutorial for making this page, but there’s really nothing to it. All I did is mount the photo on white cardstock and glue it on scrapbooking paper. Then I printed the title, cut it out and glued that down too. The whole thing took less than 10 minutes.

Read More: Scrapbooking or Home

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Flyers Scrapbook Page

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Flyers Scrapbook Page

I made this page to celebrate when my husband completed his model airplane. The plane cost over $200.00 and took over 3 months to finish. You can just imagine how thrilled I was when the project was over!

To make this page, first I mounted a sheet of white cardstock on a slightly larger sheet of orange cardstock. This created the “frame” for the page.

Then, I mounted each of my photos on slightly larger sheets of orange cardstock.

I cut out each of the letters to make the title and glued them on to the page using acid-free glue.

I dress a freehand picture of the outline of an airplane and cut it out. I used a black marker to draw some details onto the cutout.

Last, I mounted the airplane onto the page using puffy tape. This made the plane look a little like it was floating. I felt it fit in well with the flying theme.

The whole project took about an hour, and I really like the way it came out.

Read More: Scrapbooking or Home

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